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Month: April 2018

The Course of an Illness

The Course of an Illness

Until the beginning of the 20th century cancer could reasonably be considered an acute illness.  Diagnostic opportunities were limited and patients reached their doctors in the late stages, often exhibiting painful symptoms. Treatment options were also limited – radical surgery, which often wasn’t possible due to the widespread progress of the illness, or radiation. Therefore, the patient usually died not long after visiting a doctor. Since those days, society still views cancer as a fatal illness or a death sentence….

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Diagnosis – cancer [3]

Diagnosis – cancer [3]

My God, the horrible thoughts that come to mind! You’ll no doubt see the world in darker tones during the first days, weeks and even months after being diagnosed with cancer. Your future will suddenly be threatened. You’ll walk through life in a haze. You’ll supposedly talk and listen to people, but you won’t be able to concentrate. This is completely normal and most cancer patients struggle with this. It will take time to get used to your new status…

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Diagnosis – cancer [2]

Diagnosis – cancer [2]

How do I tell someone? How should I begin? Simply begin with the fact that you feel like something is wrong. That’s why you decided to visit a doctor and why you’ve made appointments for a variety of examinations including some that will potentially be able to find out if you’ve got cancer. Latvia has the so-called Green Corridor, which expedites any necessary tests to see whether or not you have a diagnosis of cancer. Then you can tell them…

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Diagnosis – cancer [1]

Diagnosis – cancer [1]

Sometimes you’re overwhelmed by a desire to run away, to disappear, to unplug or to simply forget something as if it never happened! The idea of cancer is unacceptable. It would be better if I hadn’t found out. You feel as if you have two people inside – one who stoically wants to discover everything about their disease, and the other who would prefer not knowing about it, denying it, doubting its existence altogether. The latter is your will to…

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What to look for? [Part 2]

What to look for? [Part 2]

Problems swallowing Unfortunately, not unlike elsewhere in the world, patients with oesophageal tumours usually arrive at our clinic quite late, when they can no longer swallow, or they can only do so with great difficulty. In such cases, the possibilities for treatment are very limited. For this reason, I’ll mention the warning signs that could more or less indicate the early stages of damage to the oesophagus. The first would be supposed incidences of choking, which patients often write off…

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